Food Delivery Apps in Jerusalem

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Sometimes travel can be exhausting, and that’s why we’re here to help you figure out food delivery in Jerusalem. While eating out is fun, sometimes you just want to kick back on the couch. Whether you’re in a hotel, AirBnb, or your cousin’s apartment, you don’t have to head out if you don’t want to! If you’re saving your energy to explore the city, look at our guide to 24 hours in Jerusalem or try your culinary hand with a Machane Yehuda and cooking class tour. A profusion of apps and more delivery friendly options mean you don’t have to look far for good food. And the options are endless!

Food Delivery Apps in Jerusalem

Smartphones have changed our lives in a number of ways, and one of our favorites is food delivery. With the press of a button, you can have a delicious meal brought to your doorstep. The biggest bonus here is seeing all of the available options before you commit. You can also see if the best breakfast spots in Jerusalem or the best restaurants in Jerusalem offer delivery. Here are our favorite food delivery apps in Jerusalem.

Wolt – One of the newest apps on the scene, Wolt is popular in Europe and now Israel as well. Download it on your iPhone, Android, or any other smartphone. You can see restaurants that deliver near you and even specify a delivery time. Food can be ordered in advance for pickup, or to be eaten in the restaurant. Wolt connects to a number of restaurants that normally don’t deliver, opening a new world.

Tapingo – Available on iPhones, Blackberries, and Android phones, Tapingo is the second most popular way to order delivery and pickup. It also allows for scheduling in advance, ensuring the most convenient experience. Their number of restaurants is wide, and it’s a more established food delivery app in Jerusalem.

TenBis – A common perk for startups and other employees is to provide a TenBis card. The card is usually loaded with a prepaid amount, and can also be purchased by individuals. It allows you access to restaurants that may not be on other apps. It’s the most extensive app here, and incredibly easy to use. They also allow for multiple orders at once that can be delivered together.

Restaurants with Delivery in Jerusalem

While everything can be delivered in theory, gourmet restaurants tend not to do it. They have to worry about plating and multiple temperatures to maintain, but basically everyone else delivers! You can view restaurants in Jerusalem for some inspiration. Some of our favorites include classic Asian foods from noodles to sushi, Italian standbys like pizza and pasta, Israeli street foods like falafel and hummus, and the perennial favorites: burgers and sandwiches.

Important to note: If you’re ordering from an app or over the phone, most restaurants have a minimum order amount. This can vary from 50 to 100 nis, so it isn’t always the cheapest option available.

Paying for the Delivery

Tipping Food Delivery Jerusalem

All of the apps above require a card of some type, and others can be linked directly to an Israeli bank account or Apple Pay. A common issue most tourists face is not being able to pay with an international credit card. Many Israeli based apps require a national ID number, or Teudat Zehut, to connect to your card. If you run into this issue, we recommend contacting the restaurant directly. Be sure to ask if delivery costs extra, and if so, how much.

Tipping the Courier

We highly recommend tipping your courier, both since it’s customary and because it’s polite. While most prefer cash, there’s the option to tip on Wolt through your credit card as well. Anything from 10 shekels for an easy or close delivery to 20 for a rainy day trip is acceptable. We offer a more full guide on how to tip in Israel if you’re looking for more help!

Our Favorite Delivery Restaurants

Asian: JLM Kosher Sushi, Mian Noodles, and Station 9
Italian: Al Dente, Foccacia Bar, and La Piedra
Israeli: Rimon Cafe, Jachnun Bar, and Hummus Pinati
Sandwiches and Burgers: Josef Burger & Bar, Safta Sandwich, and Aricha Sabich

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