Parking in Tel Aviv

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As with any big city, parking in Tel Aviv can be confusing and a hassle. Add in the language barrier and an array of rules and regulations, and you’ve got a disaster in the making! We’re here to help, offering an overview of parking in Tel Aviv, both paid and free. If you’re looking for a car to rent, use our search engine, or take a look at our guide to getting to and from Ben Gurion Airport. From decoding signs to tips and tricks for scouting a great spot, we’ve got you covered.

Paying for Parking in Tel Aviv

Pango Parking App

Paying for parking can be done a number of ways, although the easiest is through an app. Cellopark allows you to pay with a card, but is only available in Hebrew. Pango is available in a number of languages, and allows you to pay from your phone. For city parking lots, the app Achuzatot Ha’hof can be used, and this is only available in Hebrew as well. All lots will have either an automated payment system or a guardhouse where you’ll be able to pay. It’s important to note that many lots in commercial buildings and malls will only accept cash payments.

Curbside Parking

Curbside parking is available throughout the city, although it’s often difficult to find during peak hours and a tight fit. The signs that regulate when parking spots can be used and who can use them are all in Hebrew. We’ve included here photos of both the regular and restricted parking signs in English.

Parking in Tel Aviv is divided into different zones based on their colors. Curbs with no color are open for parking according to posted signs. Red and white stripes designate emergency vehicle areas and no parking is allowed. Red and grey stripes allow parking occasionally, posted signs will detail the regulations. Blue and white stripes mean parking is allowed. If you’re borrowing a car from a Tel Aviv resident, their car should have a sticker that allows free parking in these areas. If you’re thinking of renting a car, paid parking is allowed from 9 am to 5 pm Sunday through Thursday and 9 am to 1 pm Friday and holidays, and prohibited all other hours. Some of these zones never allow parking for non-residents, so be careful!

Pango Parking App

Parking Lots

There are numerous lots across the city, especially in the more popular parts of Tel Aviv. These range from small private lots to expansive city owned lots. Every mall, and nearly every large commercial building or office, has private parking available. These are sometimes open to the public for a fee. The largest free lot is the Reading Lot at 7 Rokach Boulevard, and is a convenient place to catch a number of buses. Some of the larger paid lots include Tel Aviv University parking lot at Shevet Binyamin 1, the lot at Gruzenberg 16, and the Millenium Lot at Harba’a 17.

Parking Garages

Parking Garage Tel Aviv

There are a number of parking garages, both private and public, that offer paid parking throughout the city. These can be found close to hotels and busy areas, like the Dizingoff Center and beaches. You’ll also find them close to the Carmel and Sarona markets, along Rothschild Boulevard, near the entrances to Neve Tzedek, and across Jaffo. There are also larger garages near the Namal Tel Aviv, and along Nachlat Binyamin.

Private Parking

Depending on where you’re staying, whether that’s a private residence, hotel, or AirBnb, you may get lucky and have a private parking lot at your disposal. This is perfect if you’re just looking for a home base to keep the car before leaving the city. If you can’t use taxis, busses, or your own two legs to get around the city, you’ll need to double check the regulations below. Additionally, private lots can sometimes be crowded and require you ask another resident to move their car before you may exit. Check with your host beforehand so you aren’t stuck!

Navigating Parking in Tel Aviv

We’ve covered a lot of information, and hope you feel less lost than before. Costs can also rack up quickly, and driving can be a bit of an adrenaline pumper in Israel. Unless you really need a car, we don’t recommend renting one. And why do that when we offer private and convenient transportation?

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